Warren Washington
Distinguished Scholar, National Center for Atmospheric Research/University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
Presentation
NCSE Lifetime Achievement Award Remarks
Biography

Dr. Warren Washington became one of the first developers of groundbreaking atmospheric computer models in the 1960s. These models, which use fundamental laws of physics to predict future states of the atmosphere, have helped scientists understand climate change and were used extensively in the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment, for which National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists, including Washington, shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Washington has engaged in research for over 50 years, and has given advice, testimony, and lectures on global climate change. Washington has been a member of the President's National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmosphere and has had presidential appointments under the Carter, Reagan, Clinton, and Bush administrations. More recently, he served on the National Science Board as a member (1994-2006) and as its chair (2002-2006). Washington has many awards, including being a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Meteorological Society (former president), the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2010, he was awarded the National Medal of Science by President Obama, the nation's highest science award "for his development and use of global climate models to understand climate and explain the role of human activities and natural processes in the Earth's climate system and for his work to support a diverse science and engineering workforce."